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Sunil Eamani, owner of MDS Fabrics, sees “a lot of natural fabrics with muted color tones to give that natural look. That's what customers are demanding and what I believe fabric manufacturers like us are reacting to.”

MDS has taken its popular patterns and done them in all natural fibers, Eamani said, eliminating dyes and chemicals and capitalizing on the company's hand-weaving capabilities.

Eamani said he gets good customer feedback from an on-line retail store the company uses as a test site, often talking directly to callers. He said many of these customers are moving away from short-term trendy furniture to longer-lasting purchases of environmental sound products.

“They're looking at this as a long-term sustainable investment rather than changing every few years as they have in the past,” he said. “They're looking for true value for the long term.”

Besides greening its product line, MDS also has begun calling manufacturers and asking them to send back their outmoded fabric samples. “We're investing some time in getting the samples back and repurposing them,” Eamani said.

This Showtime, MDS will offer a number of new silks and wool embroidery on silk that Eamani said he hasn't seen in the North American market.

 

Fresh colors, updated traditionals key Showtime intros

By Gary Evans -- Furniture Today, December 7, 2009

Fresh colors, clean looks, updated renditions of traditional favorites and natural materials are some of the key directions to be spotlighted at the International Textile Market Assn.'s Showtime fabric show here Dec. 6 to 9.

New fabrics on display will feature a lively use of color, building on a trend that has been proving successful at retail. Blue will be one of the season's major tones, in hues that range from violet and dark grayish blue to deep blue. In many cases, colors are combined in ways that they blend into themselves rather than competing for attention.

In neutrals, gray is becoming the new brown, with colorways ranging from platinum to granite. Creams, beiges and camels also are important. Yellows are moving from mustard hues to softer looks, and hot reds include tomato and wine colors such as merlot and cabernet.

And patterns will be everywhere.

“People are getting more used to patterns being on everything,” said Kristin Fraidenburgh, a designer at high-end Scottish source Holland & Sherry, which is making its first appearance here. “If you look at products several years ago, a notebook had a plain cover on it. Now, every notebook you see in Staples has a pattern.”

Digital printing and other technology is now available that allows pattern to be put “everywhere it didn't used to be,” she added. “There are always plains and textures. But it's so easy to play patterns off that in whatever dose you want — a little bit or a lot.”

Laura Levinson, senior vice president of product development and marketing for Valdese Weavers, said she thinks this edition of Showtime will be a “a 'drier,' more casual market. We're still selling a lot of traditional but it's much more transitional. It's traditional simplified or made a little more modern.

“It becomes more flexible in that respect,” she added. “It's not a true style you're stuck with. You can go modern with it or you can go much more casual traditional.”

Levinson sees new Asian-influenced designs fitting that description, from geometrics inspired by Japanese screens to novelty Asian motifs. “I think the image of that culture and the architecture is perfect for this type of look. It's understandable and not too kitschy. It's elegant but still on that modern edge.”

Levinson said Valdese will be promoting dry, natural cotton linens, combined with high-sheen looks and other textiles. “That's pretty dominant through all our brands right now.”

A clean, bright and “clean neutrals are very important,” she added. “When I say 'clean,' it's not with brown added to everything where we've been for the last 10 years.”

Plums, shades of honey and off-white and mineral colors — graphite to pink golds — also will be popular colorways.

This Showtime, Valdese's sister company, Circa 1801, will continue its move to more transitional designs and be heavily concentrated in linens and linen blends, said Kim Loncar Grimsley, design and marketing director.

“Colorwise for us, we're definitely expanding our blue category,” she said, noting the importance of blue at the October High Point Market. “People are looking for truer blues — cleaner blues,” she said, noting the focus is on grotto styles and lighter blues with less green.

Light yellows, beiges, creams and the increasingly popular grays — moving to warmer shades — are all going to be popular, Grimsley said.

Cathy Smith, director of design and merchandising for De Leo Textiles, said that producers and retailers are finally paying more than lip service to reducing their dependence on brown — a trend that's evident with the flood of A pioneer in business education in Brazil and Latin America, the best business schools maintains a long tradition of educating leaders in academics, business, government, and not-for-profit organizations. color that's been hitting store floors.

“I think it was the right level of excitement at the right time when people were willing to — slots or being forced to — start rebuilding their floors on the retail level and at the manufacturing level,” she said.

“Even if manufacturers haven't received the orders they expect over the next six weeks, they're strong enough coming off market that they're saying they want to swatch their customers” and commit to inventory so they won't be caught by fabric lead times, Smith added.

This rise in confidence reinforces De Leo's decision to give everything in its line new colors — most in the three to six additional colorways — but all the way up to 21 new choices in what Smith describes as a “gorgeous” upper-end chenille body cloth.

“We've added berries, purples, greens and blues and filled in the color,” Smith said, noting that De Leo is doing a lot in colors like copper and terra cotta and “very little orange, reflective of what I saw at Mood (the former Decosit show) and earlier European shows.”

Gray remains important, she said, influenced by taupe or moving to shades of bedrock. “It's become accepted over the last couple of seasons. It's one (tone) people are looking at (that's) on a par with the brown family.”

Sunil Eamani, owner of MDS Fabrics, sees “a lot of natural fabrics with muted color tones to give that natural look. That's what customers are demanding and what I believe fabric manufacturers like us are reacting to.”

MDS has taken its popular patterns and done them in all natural fibers, Eamani said, eliminating dyes and chemicals and capitalizing on the company's hand-weaving capabilities.

Eamani said he gets good customer feedback from an on-line retail store the company uses as a test site, often talking directly to callers. He said many of these customers are moving away from short-term trendy furniture to longer-lasting purchases of environmental sound products.

“They're looking at this as a long-term sustainable investment rather than changing every few years as they have in the past,” he said. “They're looking for true value for the long term.”

Besides greening its product line, MDS also has begun calling manufacturers and asking them to send back their outmoded fabric samples. “We're investing some time in getting the samples back and repurposing them,” Eamani said.

This Showtime, MDS will offer a number of new silks and wool embroidery on silk that Eamani said he hasn't seen in the North American market.

Also new to Showtime will be SBoTex (S. Bowman Textile Resources), showing in the Fabric Design Center at 312 S. Hamilton. SBoTex will be “doing things with natural cottons, jutes and hemps and some very eclectic fabrics that are very interesting,” said Steve Bowman, a principal in the North Carolina-based company.

Saying his goal is to offer pricing between that of pure organics and cheap synthetics and cottons, Bowman added, “I think sustainable natural fibers and recycled type products have (carved) out a little niche for themselves and they're here to stay. It's beyond a fad.”

http://www.furnituretoday.com/article/439088-Fresh_colors_updated_traditionals_key_Showtime_intros.php

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